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watering fabric pots

Watering fabric pots

The sturdy yet breathable fabric of your garden pot has a few key benefits over traditional plastic or ceramic pots:

  • Our pot drains freely and provides more oxygen to root systems to encourage healthier plant growth.
  • The felt walls of the plant help “air-prune” the roots, preventing root circling that occurs in plastic or ceramic containers.
  • The additional air flow also keeps soil temperatures from getting too hot in the summer sun.
  • The durable yet lightweight construction will last for years, but also can be transported easily by its handles to new locations whenever necessary.
How does the Olla Watering System work?

The clay pots that come with your Fabric Garden Pot, known as Ollas (“Oy-yahs”), have been used for centuries as a “low-tech” way to carefully water plants and regulate soil moisture. After the clay pots are formed, they are kiln-dried at a lower temperature than normal, which leaves tiny holes in the clay called micro-pores. When the soil that surrounds the buried pot becomes dry, water is able to flow through the micro-pores of the pot walls and into the soil, so roots can make use of the moisture. The pots only release water when plant roots need it, which decreases water waste and keeps away soil pests!

Why doesn’t this product come with soil and plants?

The Self-Watering Fabric Garden Pot is meant as a “blank canvas” upon which gardeners can grow nearly anything their heart desires! We leave the plant and soil selection up to the individual gardener so they can grow whatever they’d like, while our container makes it easy and fuss-free. Your local gardening center will have a wide selection of your favorite herb and vegetable seedlings and potting soils to get you growing.

What kind of soil should I buy for my Garden Pot?

Plants will grow best in a potting mix formulated for container gardening that drains well. In addition, certain plants prefer slightly different potting mix ingredients to provide optimal nutrition. Consult your local garden center or nursery for specific recommendations for your plants.

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Growth and Care Questions

What types of plants can grow in the Fabric Garden Pot?

A large selection of herbs, leafy greens, vegetables, and flowers can be grown in the Fabric Garden Pot! The 5 gallon capacity of the planter provides plenty of growing space for nearly all herbs and leafy green varieties, as well as many popular vegetables like tomatoes, peppers, peas, beans, and more.

Plants not recommended for the Fabric Garden Pot include root vegetables (potatoes, carrots, radishes, etc.) and large-fruit varieties such as watermelons, squash, or pumpkins.

How many plants can I grow at one time?

We recommend transplanting a maximum of two herb or leafy green seedlings, or one larger vegetable seedling into the We know the Fabric Garden Pot may seem like it can fit a lot more than just 1 or 2 plants, but most plant varieties prefer having a lot of space for their roots to grow! When you provide adequate space and nutrients for plant roots to grow, the stems, leaves, and fruits that grow above ground will flourish.

Can I start my plants from seed instead of buying transplants?

Back to the Roots highly recommends transplanting pre-grown starter plants into your Garden Pot. To grow plants from seed in this container, you will need to follow separate instructions that apply to the specific seed variety you are planting. These can often be found on the purchased seed packet or online.

When growing plants from seed in the Fabric Garden Pot, the Olla Watering System will not function properly until after seeds have germinated and developed significant root structure. Water seeds directly for 4-6 weeks until roots have developed enough to make use of the watering system.

How do I select healthy seedlings from my local garden center?

It is best to consult the experts at your local garden center when selecting seedlings for your Fabric Garden Pot, but healthy seedlings usually have:

  • Strong, thick plant stems
  • Dark green leaves
  • Slightly damp (but not muddy) soil

And should not have:

  • Flower buds or blooms (it’s too early for this!)
  • Roots that have circled around the inner wall of the container (known as “bound roots”)
How much sun do my plants need?

After transplanting, most plant varieties will need fertilizer every 3–4 weeks as they grow, and possibly more during fruiting stages. Use a fertilizer that supplies the correct nutrients for your specific varieties of plants and apply as directed. Important – Do not add fertilizer to the water in your ollas, as it will not be released into the soil effectively. Instead, water your pot’s soil directly whenever you add fertilizer to most effectively provide nutrients to your plants.

How often should I fill up my watering system?

Add water to your Fabric Garden Pot when the ollas are nearing empty. Because plants will need different amounts of water based on their variety, maturity, and environmental conditions, filling frequency will vary. Begin by checking the olla water levels about 3 times per week, and adjust to more or less frequent based on the water levels observed. Note, The ollas will only release water when your plants need it, so there is no harm in filling them up even if they aren’t fully empty.

Why is the top of my soil dry, even though I’m watering through the Olla pots regularly?

Dry topsoil is very typical when using the Olla Watering System. Because the olla pots release moisture directly near the plant roots (that are deep under the surface), typically the top 2 inches of soil do not need much water. This actually helps limit unnecessary evaporation and keeps moisture-loving soil pests away!

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Watering fabric pots The sturdy yet breathable fabric of your garden pot has a few key benefits over traditional plastic or ceramic pots: Our pot drains freely and provides more oxygen

Best Way to Water Plants In Fabric Pots

What is the best way to water plants in fabric pots? Someone told me that watering from the top is bad for the plants. I can’t figure out any other way to do this, unless I can put the pot in some water and let it wick up from the bottom of the pot?

This post was edited by awestruck on Mon, Mar 24, 14 at 10:24

Comments (13)

seysonn

What did that ” Someone” propose ?

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awestruck

Nothing, but I did ask, so I will wait for a response. She just said that the pictures of the soil I sent in looked fungal and she thought of the possibility of overwater. Then she asked if I were watering from the top and said that I shouldn’t be watering from the top (didn’t say why).

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hairmetal4ever

Doesn’t bottom watering make it virtually impossible to flush salts?

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awestruck

I like watering from the bottom when I am using plastic or Jiffy pots with seeds I am trying to germinate. If I were using those type of pots with my transplanted plants, I could still put them in water and let the water ‘wick up’ the soil, but I can’t imagine doing that in a fabric pot, especially when the pot holds 20 gallons of soil. I can only water them from the top using a fabric pot, unless there is something I don’t know about watering plants in fabric pots (which is very possible for me to not know).

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awestruck

I like watering from the bottom when I am using plastic or Jiffy pots with seeds I am trying to germinate. If I were using those type of pots with my transplanted plants, I could still put them in water and let the water ‘wick up’ the soil, but I can’t imagine doing that in a fabric pot, especially when the pot holds 20 gallons of soil. I can only water them from the top using a fabric pot, unless there is something I don’t know about watering plants in fabric pots (which is very possible for me to not know).

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seysonn

Well, I bottom water all my seedlings. But they are in 4-5″ plastic pots. How can bottom water a 7 gal. fabric pot ? I wouldn’t trust fabric pot to lift all season in and out of water. One day it might just fall apart.

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Jay Part Shade (Zone 10B, S21, Los Angeles)

Hey, I have about 100 fabric pots, everything from trees to veggies. I have watered every imaginable way, including wick systems.

I think that person told you not to water from the top so you don’t get the plants’ leaves wet. That’s good advice, otherwise your plants will have mold and all sorts of bad stuff.

You want to just water the soil, not use a sprinkler or hose everything down. Drip systems also work really well. Keep the leaves dry, the soil wet.

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awestruck

I think that is good advice. I love using the spray bottle, but it does get the leaves wet and that is not good. I have an ancient hose set up that would serve like a soaker hose, but I will not use it. It is probably 30 years old and I just took it out of the box yesterday. The plastic on it was sticky from being in a box for so long. But, I would like to figure out how to use a soaker system. Perhaps I should just buy a soaker hose and lay it over my plants? I don’t need along one. I wonder if there are shorter ones available?

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seysonn

Top watering is not the same as SPRINKLE watering. You can use a garden hose, watering can to water your tomatoes without getting the leaves wet. Additionally :

— trim the lower leaves
— water in the morning so, even if the leaves get wet, they will dry up during the day. Most fungal diseases is resulted from evening watering. BUT then what you do when you get a lot of rain ? Dealing with natural elements is not an exact science.

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awestruck

So, I guess the main goal in watering these plants in containers (or really any plants) is to not get the leaves wet? I am looking into getting a soaker hose today. It might be a little long, but I will see. Also, I have bought some potting soil that is organic but it is put out by one of those major companies like Miracle Gro or Scott. I really like this potting soil compared to what I was using, but it is extremely expensive. It is not tight though, and will allow water and air to go through and get to the roots. I’ll see if that makes a difference too.

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Jay Part Shade (Zone 10B, S21, Los Angeles)

Soaker hoses are fine, but you’ll need to keep the pots lined up so there aren’t gaps between the pots. Otherwise, the hose will sag and the water will pool at the lowest point. I used soaker hoses for a number of seasons but now I’ve moved completely to a drip watering system. Drip watering, while looking complicated, really isn’t — just stick to 1/4″ tube and 1/2 gal emitters. You can get everything you need at Home Depot. It’s maybe $20 to set up a dozen planters.

Also, you can fill your bags up more (based on the pic above) — there’s really no reason to keep bags only partially filled. It’ll make laying out hose/drippers much, much easier.

Finally, in the past I’ve used Kelloggs Patio Plus and Gardner and Bloome Blue Ribbon. The Blue Ribbon, at about $9/bag, is not cheap but it’s pretty quality and much, much better than Miracle Gro. I’ve started making the 5-1-1 mix but that’s a lot more time intensive, though ultimately cheaper.

What is the best way to water plants in fabric pots? Someone told me that watering from the top is bad for the plants. I can't figure out any other way to do this, unless I can put the pot in some water and let it wick up from the bottom of the pot? This post was edited by awestruck on Mon, Mar 24, …